Easy Fig Pudding and Why I Love Figs

Easy Fig Pudding and Why I Love Figs
Fig tree Jamestown 2005
Our fig tree circa 2005. Wish I could have found the winter pic without leaves – it was a gnarly mass of giant stumps and twisting branches.

It’s fig season! I think I’m safe to say that, at this exact moment, figs are my favorite fruit. Ask me in a couple months when another totally seasonal fruit comes on the market, and you’ll get a different answer… But, for now, it’s figs.

Nothing compares to fresh figs in the summer. They come with a higher price tag and are a special treat around my house.

I’ve been reminiscing about the old, gnarly fig tree where we used to live. It was totally ugly, but it put out two huge crops of figs every year. And, at the time, I didn’t appreciate them! Horrors!!

This will probably be one of the first fruit trees I plant in my future orchard since they are pretty successful in Vegas. If you are lucky enough to live in a southern climate where temps don’t routinely go below 20 degrees F, you can do the same. Just know that they are water hogs… But I digress. Let’s talk instead about how awesome the fruit is.

Combine With…

When making a dessert, figs go well with warm spices like cinnamon, cloves, cardamon, nutmeg, and anise. You could blend any of those into my following fig pudding recipe to make it even more special. Figs also compliment nuts and citrus. For a more savory touch, try pairing with garlic, olives, or capers.

Eat ’em Quick

Figs are fragile and very perishable. Plump, slightly wrinkled figs are what you want. Keep them at room temp with good air circulation and eat them within a couple days. It’s okay to put them in the fridge to extend their life, but the coldness will dampen their flavor.

Nutritionally Speaking

Just one fig has over 3% the daily value of potassium, manganese, and vitamin B6, and they are also a great source of fiber.

Figs contain oxalates, similar to spinach, which can hamper the absorption of calcium. However, unless you have gallbladder or kidney problems, they are still worth including in your diet.

Urban Legend: Are Figs Really Full of Wasps?

Figs require wasps for pollination, but the female wasp actually lays her eggs in the male figs (yes there are boy and girl fruits) as opposed to the female edible figs. Don’t get too excited yet, because if females accidentally enter the edible figs they get stuck and die there.

But then something crazy happens, and an enzyme in the fruit breaks down the wasp, basically digesting her until she is a part of the ripened fruit. So when you cut open your fig and peer around for wasp body parts, there are none. Strangely, knowing this comforted me.

Here’s a fascinating article if you want to read more about figs and wasps.

3-Ingredient Fig Pudding Recipe

Ingredients:

Fig Pudding with berries

8 figs, destemmed
1 date, chopped
1/2 – 1 Tbsp coconut flour*

Directions:

Using the food processor**, process until a pudding consistency. Top with shredded coconut and berries to finish it off.

*This is quite thick. If you want it to be thinner, try using half the coconut flour or even none at all!

You could probably use almond meal or leftover almond pulp (from making nutmilk) instead. Coconut flour soaks up a huge amount of liquid so when subbing, you need to use more to get the same consistency.

I tried subbing 1 Tbsp of rolled oats for the coconut flour and it was still nice though it tasted sorta oatmeal-y. I let it sit a few minutes to thicken.

**I used the food processor for a chunky texture, but you could probably blend this also.

This pudding is surprisingly filling. I ate it for lunch yesterday along with a bowl of mixed berries. I’ve also made it with extra dates before as a dessert. Yum!

Now Your Turn. How do you eat figs? Leave it in the comments below.

This is another Healthy Vegan Friday and Wellness Weekend.

More Unforgettable Insight

6 Responses to Easy Fig Pudding and Why I Love Figs

  1. Figs are my favorite fruit. I eat them all just as nature made them. I planted a fig tree 3 years ago and it always has fruit, but they never ripen?

    • Gayla, if your fruit never ripens, then possibly this is due to a stressed tree. Without having seen the tree, I’m going to guess it may need more water. Figs require a lot of water, especially in the high heat of Vegas. If not water, then look into nutrients – do you fertilize it? If it’s stressed, it will pull resources away from ripening fruit and put them towards basic survival. Hope that helps!

  2. Figs are my favorite fruit. I eat them all just as nature made them. I planted a fig tree 3 years ago and it always has fruit, but they never ripen?

    • Gayla, if your fruit never ripens, then possibly this is due to a stressed tree. Without having seen the tree, I’m going to guess it may need more water. Figs require a lot of water, especially in the high heat of Vegas. If not water, then look into nutrients – do you fertilize it? If it’s stressed, it will pull resources away from ripening fruit and put them towards basic survival. Hope that helps!

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